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Two weeks ago in New York, we spotted two Ghost Bikes on our way from Midtown to The Village on foot.  These are not a common feature of Baltimore City.  In the City Paper‘s bike issue this spring, they interviewed Nate Evans, the City government’s top bike gent:

CP: How does the cycling fatality rate in Baltimore compare to other big cities?

NE: We are actually very low. From 2002 to 2008, we had maybe four fatalities. I think the last one we had was two years ago. The Police Department and DOT share their crash statistics, so we can kind of track where that’s happening. Even New York City, which has a very high number of cyclists, has a very high percentage of bike deaths compared to us.

I should not type this (KNOCK ON WOOD! KNOCK ON WOOD! KNOCK ON WOOD!!!!), but since we have not had a cycling death in Baltimore in like two years (read this article for the rest), I had never seen a Ghost Bike in person before.

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You see pictures on the internet or Yehuda Moon, and some of the photos are fantastic and all that. But you have to see people looking at it on their lunch break wondering what the hell it means to appreciate what a startling and…powerful image it is.  I could not stop looking at either one, and I really totally and actually felt a tinge of guilt for photographing them.
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Despite their message that can really only be conveyed in person, I can’t say I’m an ANY rush to see one around Baltimore — ever. But is it an inevitability? I don’t know.  On good days, I think the about the great work that the City government and local activists are doing and that riding in Baltimore gets one very skilled in urban cycling very quickly and so that a cycling death may be another two years off.  On other days, I see the way people in general and people in Baltimore drive, and I don’t feel so nicely about our odds as a cycling city and as cyclists who are living beings with families and connections and who the world will miss if we get smashed by a careless cab or sinister SUV or a damned door-prize.

And if/when our next cycling fatality happens, will cycling in Baltimore drop off? Because, I have to say, even with the Baltimore summer setting in, I’m seeing more people riding and more bikes on racks.

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Saw this dapper gent in Washington Square Park in New York last week. He looked so relaxed that I thought about getting a single-speed bike, like I was telling Dan. But then I remembered that Baltimore is much more hilly than Manhattan. Still, I liked that bike, especially that he used the mounting brackets for a metal rack for a milkcrate.

From a great article on the new bike culture in New York:

For biking to make it to the next level, for bikes to be completely accepted as the viable form of city transportation that they are, bikers must switch sides. They must act like people and stop acting like cars…It means getting a little personal, though not that personal. Acting like people means that we have to do things that we frankly don’t want to do and things that we want cars to do, like slow down.

There will be caveats. Perhaps your wife is about to go into labor and you take her to the hospital on your bike; then, yes, sure, go the wrong way in the one-way bike lane. We can handle caveats. We are bikers.

….when I imagine the tone of the new bike culture, I think of civility.

Read the rest here.


One of David Byrne’s bike racks I spotted in New York three weeks ago. I stood in traffic near Times Square to take what turned out to be a less-than-great photo. I didn’t get to see the others because I didn’t know they’d be out, else I would have looked them up before I left.


I had trouble crossing the roadway in Central Park for all the bike traffic. Now that’s congestion I’m glad to see. The thingy wherein streets were closed happened that day, too. I wished I had my bike with me on my travels.


I didn’t see them get into any U-locks, but this is still disturbing. High-traffic areas might not make a difference. I start at a new office Monday where I have to be…selective about where I lock up. I don’t think I’ll worry about how many people are around now. My cable for locking the wheels to my U-lock is in the mail.  And, really, my locked bike was stolen out of the locked bike room in my locked apartment building in Roland Park two years ago.  If someone wants it enough, I guess you’re screwed.

I was in New York last week, around these parts, and I saw a lot of the same chains this guy gets right through. Some of them were on really nice bikes, and I wonder what became of them. Still, I saw a lot of those hardened BEEFY chains, which tempt me. But they cost 1/4 of what my base bike cost me two years ago, and they are HEAVY.  I mean to do a post about the different locking styles I’ve seen traveling the last two weeks in Boston/Cambridge, New York and Philadelphia.  When I download my photos, that is.

[Props and thanks to Gary for the link.]

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